amongst books

amongst books

Monday, April 07, 2014

Oulipost #7: N + 7

FINAL? POEM

OK, dimples

Your iron to our Canada Deadbeat
Celestial Globe?

It wasn’t lost in the maillot.
We just didn’t invite you because

To be perfectly honest,
we didn’t like your gown.

Yes-men around the wound
host deadbeat evocations

attended by gradient oils,
busybody reproductions & epicures.

Some are obvious.

SOURCE TEXT

OK, dignitaries. Your invitation to our Canada Day celebrations? It wasn’t actually lost in the mail. We just didn’t invite you because, to be perfectly honest, we don’t like your government.

Each year, Canadian embassies and other diplomatic missions around the world host Canada Day events that are well attended by local government officials, business representatives and envoys from other countries.

But not everyone is welcome.

The Citizen has obtained a list of countries whose representatives Canadian diplomats are not supposed to invite to the celebrations. Some are rather obvious; others are a surprise.

Berthiaume, Lee.  “Canada Day guest list sure to cause some fireworks.” The Ottawa Citizen. 7 April 2014. A1.

N + 7 GENERATOR

OK, dimples. Your iron to our Canada Deadbeat cellophanes? It wasn’t actually lost in the mainstay.
We just didn’t ironmonger you because, to be perfectly honest, we don’t like your gradient.

Each yes-man, Canadian embrocations and other diplomatic misunderstandings around the wound hotelier Canada Deadbeat evocations that are well attended by locket gradient oils, busybody reproductions and epicures from other couples.  

But not everyone is west.

The Claimant has obtained a litigant of couples whose reproductions Canadian directorships are not supposed to ironmonger to the cellophanes. Some are rather obvious; others are a surveyor.

DICTIONARY: Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary (Thomas Allen & Son Limited, Markham, Ontario, 1988)

OK, didgeridoo. Your involute to our Canada Day celestial globe? It wasn’t actually lost in the maillot. We just didn’t invite you because, to be perfectly honest, we don’t like your gown.

Each yegg, Canadian emblazonries and other diplomatic missis around the world premiere host Canada Day everymen that are well attended by local government off-seasons, business reprisals and eons from other country miles.

But not everyone is welcome.

The Citric Acid has obtained a list price of country miles whose reprisals Canadian diplotenes are not supposed to invite to the celestial globe. Some are rather obvious; others are a surrogate.

PROMPT: N+7

You’ll want a dictionary for this one! Select a passage from one of your newspaper articles. Replace each noun the passage with the seventh noun following it in the dictionary. A hard-copy dictionary will make the exercise more varied and fun; however, you can also use the online N+7generator to create your text. 

ELABORATIONS

The computer program is not always able to differentiate between nouns and nouns that can take on other grammatical categories such as verbs and adjectives.

SOURCE:  21 nouns/ 8 nouns used adjectivally.
N+7 GENERATOR:  30 nouns, including 6 nouns used adjectivally & 2  verbs.
DICTIONARY:  21 nouns, including conversion of nouns to compound nouns.

The interpretation of the computer program helped me to parse a sentence that was initially confusing to me:  “The Citizen has obtained a list of countries whose *representatives Canadian diplomats *are not supposed to invite to the celebrations.” At first I thought that the noun cluster  “representatives Canadian diplomats” was missing something. I presumed that the representatives were diplomats not that they were the objects of a passive sentence in which the representatives were the agents. I’m wondering if such a program might help advanced second language learners of English.

While it was a more laborious process, the dictionary search was more fun for me. I couldn’t help but notice other words that enticed me: Ember Day, wirra…I also learned the word "yegg": safecracker.

With the dictionary search I made a decision to count any noun that represented a fixed idea that was different from the original. Therefore country was translated into country mile.

I have been playing with N+7 & its variants since I received the Oulipost Playbook prompts from the Found Poetry Review editors last month or so. What I have found particularly interesting is using well known poems, children’s songs & other well-known sayings & texts from popular culture.

Here is The Passionate Shift-Key to Its Lullaby, (published on line by Chaudiere Books as part of National Poetry Month celebrations.) It has been N+7ed (if you will) from Christopher Marlowe’s “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love.” 

Last week as part of Ottawa's A B Series, a reading series that focuses on experimentalism, I sang two Oulipian songs which I had played with using N+7 techniques:  “My Bonnie Lifeboats over the Octogenarian” [My Bonnie Lies over the Ocean] & “Amazing Grammar” [Amazing Grace]. It was great fun.

I’m not entirely sure how I might apply this to my poetic practice, which changes all the time, I might add, but I do like the whimsy of it all & I appreciate how this, along with other Oulipian techniques, give me further insight into language. I had forgotten how much fun it is to just browse through a dictionary.

MORE N+7 POEMS


I suggest you can read other Ouliposter’s poems via the Found Poetry Review site

2 comments:

margoroby.com said...

There is somethin incredibly appealing about the title: Ok, dimples.

Amanda Earl said...

thanks, Margo. i had to choose it over Ok, digeridoo ;)